Tag Archives: celtic art

Bumblepost: Start Anywhere

Owen here! Today I’d like to talk to you about just getting started!

Sometimes (maybe a lot of times) I have trouble getting started with things I’m really interested in doing. It’s easy to get caught in an unhelpful cycle where at night I’ll think, “I’m so psyched about doing this thing tomorrow!” And then tomorrow comes, and I want to do everything but that thing.

My superpowers don’t end there, though. Sometimes I can not only successfully avoid doing the things I want to do, but I actually forget what I’m supposed to be doing! I’ll sit down to do a project with identical steps that I’ve followed before – and I just can’t make any sense of it.

When this happens, I find there is nothing for it but a hard push, and just getting started. Recognizing when I tend to need to just get started has helped me get through stressful creative times, plan my day better, and accomplish lots more. So if you haven’t already, I suggest working on figuring out when you just need to push yourself to get started.

Worksheet: Start Anywhere Coloring Page

To help make this more fun, I’m including a free coloring page! The text is a little blurry, because I’m still learning how to balance out readability with a high level of detail. (Note: It’s a PDF! Sorry!)

Start Anywhere Knotwork Coloring Page

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: Jen Delyth

Owen here! Today I’d like to tell you about Jen Delyth, a Celtic artist from Wales!

To me, Jen Delyth’s work really typifies the modern Celtic artist. Vibrant glowing colors with heavy shading; mythological symbols so deep that they hold meaning whether or not we know their origin; free flowing play between larger forms and intricate details. Jen Delyth’s work also benefits from knowledge of multiple Celtic cultures, which provides a much larger palette of mythology to draw from.

According to Jen Delyth:

“I am intrigued by the marriage of old and new, ancient and future. This work is a personal journey into the language of Celtic myth and symbol, the beauty of nature, a simple interpretation of Celtic spirituality expressing the Mystery of the inter-connectedness and balance of all things.”

In Jen Delyth’s piece “Warrior“, you can see a wealth of details folded into open space. As you travel through the piece, more and more animals being to appear. Everything is dotted with lines, as if every subject in it is unsure of its place in reality. To me, this reads a lot like looking out into the night and trying to discern what is there, catching details for just a moment before losing them.

In the piece “Leaping Hare – Hare Leaps Through The Fire“, Jen Delyth presents a rabbit in motion. Classic Celtic animal figures represent much more what the animal is known for, rather than exact representations. This hare is in the middle of abstract and realism, so you can see how historical artists came to their artistic conclusions. The places where the limbs join provide space for slight decoration. Curved lines lead to more elaborate spirals. Details like the ears are not required to remain where they would naturally be found, but are instead able to be moved in order to better serve the composition.

Learn about Jen Delyth’s process in this post from Amber Lotus Publishing!

You can also  find more of her work in these places:

Website
Gallery
Shop

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: Mino Re

Owen here! Today I’d like to introduce you to the work of Mino Re, of Innovative Stone Arts.

Mino Re works in cast stone, oils, and carved acrylic. I am personally drawn to his work by the intricate and delicate knotwork that is carved and molded into stone. He does classic knotwork with lovely innovations – beautiful fluid lines; figures and shapes that are modern yet still distinctly celtic.

From his Etsy page, he explains a bit about his history:

I create original, affordable, unique stone art for home and garden. I find inspiration in intricate geometries like Celtic knots, fractals, spirals, and paisleys. These become decorative elements applied to my sunfaces, whimsical creatures, and interpretations of historical statues and antiquities.

I was born in Italy and learned from my father, an expert sculptor and painter. I worked in the field of architectural precast for thirty years, designing and engineering solutions for new construction and restoration. My art is now my focus, and I enjoy sharing my work at shows as well as on Etsy.

In addition to my cast stone, I work in other media as well: oil paintings, drawings in pencils and charcoals. If you’re interested in learning more about how I create my art, visit my website and blog at www.innovativestoneart.com or convo me and ask a question!

My favorite Mino Re design is this gorgeous tiger, a stone plaque cast from a plaster mold. You can see more examples of his designs here, including some that are for sale.

When presented with beautiful, complicated work, it is easy to imagine that the artist behind it simply popped into existence with highly polished skills. They snap their fingers and poof! A new masterpiece appears. This is easily disproven when given the chance to view the work that goes into creating a piece of art.

Thankfully in Mino Re’s case, he provides a thorough explanation of how some of his pieces have come together. He also has a blog where he posts photos of his work in progress – so you can see for yourself how the complexity arises!

For more, you can visit Mino Re’s:

Etsy Page
Website
Blog

 

Free downloadable coloring page: Celtic Knotwork Wheel by Owen Wills

Feeling stressed out by the holidays? Take some time to chill out with this free coloring page by Owen Wills.

To get it, click on the image below. That will take you to the full sized image you can then download & print. Then all you have to do is get out your favorite coloring implements!

CelticColoringDownload

Find more stuff to color at our Free Printables page.

Bumblepost: Learning Celtic Art – Suggested reading

Hi! Owen here! I want to take a minute to babble at you about learning how to make Celtic art. Specifically, about how I learned to make it.

Celtic Art: The Methods of Construction
– Written by George Bain

I started learning about Celtic art a few years ago when I stumbled across a very helpful book. “Celtic Art: The Methods of Construction.” It was written by a teacher named George Bain. He traveled around Europe finding examples of knotwork and recording them. He also did a lot of research into how and why it was made, at a time when there was a lot of scholarly disinterest. (Among other reasons, scholars dismissed celtic art as having merely been copied over from the art of other cultures.)

This book contains information on knotwork, plants, animals, and humans. It also has a section on a few different calligraphy fonts. The illustrations are large and, despite being in black and white, are easy to follow. Most of the text is hand lettered as well, which is charming. I personally miss seeing that in texts.

The step by step instructions in this book are easy for people who prefer to skip over written text when learning. So if you are the type to go from picture to picture when assembling pre-designed furniture, that should be a plus!

2. A Beginner’s Manual
– Written by Aidan Meehan

There are a whole lot of very interesting and helpful books written by Aidan Meehan, but I think the very first of his books will be the most useful to start with.

In “A Beginner’s Manual,” Aidan Meehan provides very clear and easy to read step by step instructions. The pictures are very easy to make out. There is more reading involved here in the instructions than in “The Methods of Construction,” but the pace of instruction is also a bit slower. I think it works well.

Once you finish this one, there are a ton of other books on every conceivable subject regarding knotwork. (Note: I haven’t read all of these, though I intend to once I can get my hands on them!)

Lastly, I want to show some of my older knotwork pictures. I have plenty of newer stuff I’ll be showing off soon, but I thought it would be fun to pull up a few of my older examples from Zazzle. I made these while first learning with “The Methods of Construction.”

First, some round tile pieces that I decided to experiment painting gradients with.

These last two are transgender symbol designs. I saw there were plenty of trans symbols making their way around the internet, but they all seemed to be the same – either black and white, or with a colorful photoshopped gradient. I wanted to see other kinds, and so here are some of mine: