Bumblepost: Clarifying your creative path

Owen here! Today I’d like to talk about giving up your dreams.

Grow up.

Put away childish things.

You can’t make a living doing that.

I bet there is no one living who hasn’t heard these kinds of sentiments, either as missiles meant to shoot down dreams, or as woeful sighs lamenting unpleasant realities. It’s common knowledge that only a few random lucky people get to have fun being creative. Everyone else needs to work jobs they hate so that one day they can save up to do things they enjoy.

While trying to escape these predictions of doom, it’s far too easy to flail around in every possible direction. If signs of progress don’t show up immediately, panic sets in, and we set off in a different direction – thinking we’ve already failed.

I invite you now to sit down comfortably. Take a deep breath. Everything is going to be fine.

I invite you to replace that old nonsense with this idea: Getting older means clarifying what we really want to do.

Think about all the things you have tried before, or have an interest in. Count them up. Chances are, there isn’t enough time in any human lifetime to pursue all of those in a worthwhile way. And for those wanting to make a creative living, it’s even more impractical to grasp every possible avenue; in addition to doing the thing you love, you’ve also got accounting, marketing, and a host of other concerns that eat into your time. Successful creative people limit their focus, and jettison things that will water it down.

I’m not going to get into the specifics of things you’ll need to do in order to get where you want to be. If you are still in the area of thinking no one survives as a creative person, then this is a much more important task right now. I invite you instead to replace that old script with this one:

 

Grow.

Play to your heart’s content.

You can make a living doing that, and other people will help you do it.

Bumblepost: My favorite tree

Owen here! Today I’d like to tell you about my favorite tree.

I live in a rain forest. Not a tropical one. I live in the Pacific Northwest, where high winds, overcast sky, and a near constant drizzle are the norm. My city (Bellingham, Washington) has been cited as having the least amount of sunshine in the US.

Despite the lack of sun, we have wonderful and diverse plant life. Most notable are the pine trees that are simply everywhere. Bellingham is home to a number of parks where visitors can surround themselves with towering conifers. Wandering among sword ferns underneath curvy pine branches, it’s very easy to imagine we have somehow landed in a prehistoric dream.

My favorite tree is a very specific tree that I discovered recently has been taken down. It was some sort of pine, but I can’t get any more specific than that. It sat at the entrance of Cornwall Park, a lovely place in the middle of everything where it isn’t hard to completely block out signs of urban life.

The most special thing about this tree was that, with the help of a neighboring bush, it created a comfortable shaded room. I used to go there with books or art supplies and simply chill. I would listen to the little birds that hopped around overhead. I could also take my glasses off to get a different view. The light shining through the green leaves of the bush glittered like fairy lights – a view that I find is hard to get normally.

Later I will tell you about my second favorite tree.

Today I learned: Blogger blog roll

Hi! Owen here! Today I’d like to share with you something I just discovered: Google still has a Blogger tool to which you can add blogs to watch.

I used to read blogs a lot more than I did social media. However, it was always difficult keeping track of all of them, and for some reason I never took to any of the other methods of keeping track of them. Technological meltdowns have led to a loss of most of the bookmarks I’ve ever used (Although I now have a simple solution for that as well!)

This tool can also be used to keep track of some non-Blogger blogs. I haven’t yet discovered why some blogs work for this and some don’t.

Anyway, to access this, you just need a google account and then go to www.blogger.com.

  1. On the left you should see an “Add” button.
  2. When you have the URL of the blog you want to keep track of, click the “Add” button, and then copy paste.
  3. Choose whether to follow publicly or anonymously.
  4. Click Follow.

If you can follow it with the Blogger tool, it will be added to your reading list. If not, you’ll get a notice saying it couldn’t be added.

I hope this helps!

Bumblepost: Come see my art at the Black Drop Coffee House, January 2016

Owen here! I’ve got a fun announcement to share!

In January 2016, I get to show my art at the famed walls of Bellingham’s Black Drop Coffee House! This is the employee owned local coffee shop that supports my corner of Bellingham’s art community. Every month they feature a different artist, and my chance is coming up!

If you can make the trip to the Black Drop in January, you’ll see glittering and glowing multimedia pieces made all sorts of materials – wood, clay, acrylic paint, hot glue, found objects, and more. If all goes according to plan, you’ll also be able to see some of my broomsticks up close and in person. Also celtic knotwork, and maybe even some coffee beans!

ARTIST SPOTLIGHT: Jen Delyth

Owen here! Today I’d like to tell you about Jen Delyth, a Celtic artist from Wales!

To me, Jen Delyth’s work really typifies the modern Celtic artist. Vibrant glowing colors with heavy shading; mythological symbols so deep that they hold meaning whether or not we know their origin; free flowing play between larger forms and intricate details. Jen Delyth’s work also benefits from knowledge of multiple Celtic cultures, which provides a much larger palette of mythology to draw from.

According to Jen Delyth:

“I am intrigued by the marriage of old and new, ancient and future. This work is a personal journey into the language of Celtic myth and symbol, the beauty of nature, a simple interpretation of Celtic spirituality expressing the Mystery of the inter-connectedness and balance of all things.”

In Jen Delyth’s piece “Warrior“, you can see a wealth of details folded into open space. As you travel through the piece, more and more animals being to appear. Everything is dotted with lines, as if every subject in it is unsure of its place in reality. To me, this reads a lot like looking out into the night and trying to discern what is there, catching details for just a moment before losing them.

In the piece “Leaping Hare – Hare Leaps Through The Fire“, Jen Delyth presents a rabbit in motion. Classic Celtic animal figures represent much more what the animal is known for, rather than exact representations. This hare is in the middle of abstract and realism, so you can see how historical artists came to their artistic conclusions. The places where the limbs join provide space for slight decoration. Curved lines lead to more elaborate spirals. Details like the ears are not required to remain where they would naturally be found, but are instead able to be moved in order to better serve the composition.

Learn about Jen Delyth’s process in this post from Amber Lotus Publishing!

You can also  find more of her work in these places:

Website
Gallery
Shop